Autism Frequently Asked Questions

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Autism Frequently Asked Questions
Autism Frequently Asked Questions

Autism Frequently Asked Questions

Autism Frequently Asked Questions

If you expect that your child has an Autism Spectrum Disorder, it is essential that you have him/her evaluated by a mental health professional who is skilled in the assessment of diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders. If you are not sure if the professional is skilled, don’t be afraid to ask about their credentials, qualifications, skills, and experience. These professionals work for you, so you have the right to know about their capabilities to complete the task at hand.

If you are concerned about your child’s development and feel that something is just not right, get them evaluated by a skilled mental health professional. You are the parent and you know your child best. If it much better to err on the side of caution, then to allow a condition to go undiagnosed and thus untreated.

Absolutely not! Autism Spectrum Disorders are developmental disorders and involve developmental delays. As the developmental periods for social skills and language pass it is much more difficult to effectively address these delays. Waiting for lengthy periods of time for a diagnosis and treatment can be detrimental to your child. If you are waitlisted, keep calling until you find a provider who can see you within a reasonable amount of time.

No. It is never to late to seek a diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Even as an adult there are services and treatments available that can help.

If you are not satisfied with the evaluation or services that you have been provided you have the right to seek services elsewhere. You deserve the undivided attention of any professional that is providing an evaluation and/or treatment. If you do not think that the evaluation you received was inadequate, seek another opinion.

While is is possible that each of these diagnoses could be right, there is also a good chance that your child has been over-diagnosed, or some of the symptoms observed might just be symptoms of a diagnosis, and not a separate diagnosis. If you are not sure that the diagnoses received fit your child it is a good idea to seek another opinion.